POSTGRADUATE AND EARLY CAREER WORKSHOP, 28/10/22: “Textual Urns-Form and Materiality of Commemorative Writing”, Birkbeck College, Londres

Avec nos excuses pour les doublons.

Textual Urns-Form and Materiality of Commemorative Writing in Early Modern England

POSTGRADUATE AND EARLY CAREER WORKSHOP & SEMINAR

Friday 28 October

13:30-17:00

Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0PD

This day explores the form and fabric of commemorative writing. It provides a forum to discuss texts of remembrance in the broader context of Early Modern England and recent interest in the materiality of the text. We aim to investigate the social, political and religious work performed by a poetics of memory and grief across material forms. It consists of a postgraduate and early career workshop followed by talks by two leading scholars working in the field to formulate new approaches. Both are open to all.

 To book  https://www.bbk.ac.uk/events/remote_event_view?id=33731 

 Programme

 13:30-14:00 Welcome and Introductions  

14:00-15:30 Postgraduate and Early Career Work in Progress Presentations and Discussion  

15:30-16:00 Tea, Coffee and Biscuit Break  

16:00-16:30 Patricia Phillippy (Coventry University), ‘“Soe darke in in the morning”: Remembrance and Climate in Alice Thornton’s Autobiographical Manuscripts’ 

16:30-17:00 Claire Gheeraert-Graffeuille (Université de Rouen Normandie), ‘Commemorating the Christian martyr and the Civil War hero in Lucy Hutchinson’s Memoirs of the Life of Colonel Hutchinson’  

17:00 Discussion, Drinks and Nibbles  

 This event is hosted by the LRS and VALE (Voix Anglophones Littérature et Esthétique Research Group, at Sorbonne Université). It is organised by Emma Bartel (Sorbonne Université) and Eva Lauenstein (Birkbeck). We are kindly supported by a Society for Renaissance Studies Small Conference Grant. For any questions, please contact e.lauenstein@bbk.ac.uk

13-14/10/2022: “Sports and Sociability in the Long Eighteenth Century”, COLL Modernités 16-18 / Grenoble, Salle des Actes (Sorbonne)

Veuillez trouver ci-joint le programme du colloque sur “Sports and Sociability in the Long Eighteenth Century” qui se tiendra à la Sorbonne le 13 et le 14 octobre (Salle des Actes).

Au plaisir de vous y retrouver.

Bien cordialement, 

Caroline Bertonèche et Alexis Tadié



Sports and Sociability in the Long Eighteenth Century

Conference program

13-14 October 2022

Sorbonne Université, Salle des Actes

13 October

9:45: Welcome and opening remarks

10:00: PLENARY LECTURE

Simon BAINBRIDGE (Lancaster University)

‘A group… of apparently aerial beings’: Sociability on the British Summit in the Long Eighteenth Century

Coffee break

11:30: First session: Outdoors, Sociability and Individuality

CHAIR: Kimberley PAGE-JONES (Université de Bretagne Occidentale)

11:30-12:00

Meiko O’HALLORAN (Newcastle University)

Scaling Ben Nevis: Keats Among the Clouds

12:00-12:30

Claire WROBEL (Université Paris-Panthéon-Assas)

Between Solitude and Sociability : Mountaineering in Ann Radcliffe’s The Romance of the Forest(1791)

12.30-13.00: Discussion

13.00: Lunch 

14:00: Second session: Building Sociability through Sports

CHAIR: Marc PORÉE (École normale supérieure-PSL)

14:00-14:30

Benjamin JACKSON (University of Birmingham)

‘The Gentleman Sportsman’: Blood Sports, Sociability, and Materiality in Eighteenth-Century England

14:30-15:00

Valérie CAPDEVILLE (Université Sorbonne-Paris-Nord)

Sports and Outdoor Recreation in Early American Clubs: Horse-Racing, Angling and Fox-Hunting Practices in Colonial Maryland and Pennsylvania

15:00-15:30

Alexis TADIÉ (Sorbonne Université)

Of Rivers and Swimming in the Long Eighteenth Century

15:30-16:30: Discussion

19.30: Conference Dinner 

14 October

9:30: Third session: Animality, Violence, and the Social Worlds of Sports

CHAIR: Marion AMBLARD (Université Grenoble Alpes)

9:30-10:00

Pierre CARBONI (Université de Nantes)

‘This falsely cheerful, barbarous game of death’: Thomson and Hunting

10:00-10:30

Mike HUGGINS (University of Cumbria)

Changing Attitudes to the Non-Human Animal World : the Case of Cock-Fighting

Coffee break

11:00-11:30

Kimberley PAGE-JONES (Université de Bretagne Occidentale) & Pierre LABRUNE (VALE)

Boxing and the Fancy: Violence Tamed and Aestheticized (1780-1815)

11:30-12:00

John C. WHALE (University of Leeds)

Pugilism in the Regency: Popularity and Cultural Appropriation

12:00-12:30: Discussion

12:30: Lunch 

14:00: Fourth session: Sports and Romanticism

CHAIR: Meiko O’HALLORAN (Newcastle University)

14:00-14:30

Andreas KRAMER (Goldsmiths, University of London)

Luminous Streams, Precipitous Rocks: Perspectives on Sport in German Romanticism

14:30-15:00

Marc PORÉE (École normale supérieure-PSL)

Wordsworth, Keats, Byron: Sport or No Sport?

15:00-15:30: Discussion

Coffee break

16:00: Caroline BERTONÈCHE (Université Grenoble Alpes)

Introducing the Virtual Museum RÊVE. Special collection: On Romantic Sports. Fencing Familiarized

16:30: Alexis TADIÉ (Sorbonne Université)

Introducing the Database AGON: On Quarrels and Controversies

17:00 Kimberley PAGE-JONES (UBO) & Valérie CAPDEVILLE (Sorbonne-Paris-Nord)

Introducing the Digital Encyclopedia DIGITENS: On British Sociability in the Long 18th Century

18:00: Closing drinks

19:00: End of the conference

“The Uses and Representations of Trees in Early Modern England”

23 June 2022, Sorbonne Université

D 421, Maison de la Recherche – Sorbonne Université

Also via zoom. Download the programme and abstracts here or see below.

09:30-09:45 Welcoming Address

Line Cottegnies and Anne-Valérie Dulac

09:45-10:45 Keynote

Chair: Line Cottegnies (Sorbonne Université)

Victoria Bladen (University of Queensland, Australia): “The Tree of Life and Arboreal Aesthetics in Renaissance culture”

11:00-12:30 Trees in/as Art

Chair: Anne-Valérie Dulac (Sorbonne Université)

Armelle Sabatier (Panthéon Assas Université, Paris): “Stones, Trees and Wood – Envisioning Garden Statuary in Shakespeare.”

 Chantal Schütz (École Polytechnique, Paris): “Of trees, harps and lutes: yew, maple, spruce and willow  in resonance”

Buffet lunch

13:45-15:15 Staging Trees

Chair: Ladan Niayesh (Université de Paris)

Nicolas Thibault (Sorbonne Université): “The tree that hides the man : manipulating and reassigning royal symbols in Thomas of Woodstock” 

Sophie Lemercier-Goddard (ENS LSH, Lyon):  “‘The Ecco of the woods’: Woodlands as the theatre of the colonial enterprise in Virginia and New England”: 

15:30-16:30 Keynote

Chair: Sandrine Parageau (Sorbonne Université)

Justin Begley (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich),), “Animalis Arbores: The Case of Nehemiah Grew’s Trees”

16:45-17:45 Trees and the 18th-century Imagination

Chair: Pierre Labrune

Laurent Folliot (Sorbonne Université): “Parasitical Beauty: The Materiality of Trees in Picturesque Discourse”

Nicolas Bourgès (Sorbonne Université) : “Trees as vehicles for reflection about nature and time in the poetry of William Cowper (1731-1800)”

17:45-18:00 Concluding Remarks & Perspectives

 

ZOOM LINK:
Sujet : Journée d’étude “Usages et représentations de l’arbre à la première modernité”
Heure : 23 juin 2022 09:00 AM Paris
 
Participer à la réunion Zoom
 
ID de réunion : 863 9658 3350
Code secret : 734031

_______

Abstracts

Victoria Bladen (University of Queensland, Australia), “The Tree of Life and Arboreal Aesthetics in Renaissance culture

Across early modern European culture grew a complex language of trees that surrounded the concept of the tree of life. It was articulated in a variety of media and forms: illuminated manuscripts, woodcuts, paintings, mosaic, fresco, sculpture, and pageantry.  Arboreal motifs and metaphors were a significant vehicle for expressing ideas of spiritual knowledge and articulating religious ideology.  The sources for arboreal iconography lay in biblical text however the meanings that were read from these images extended beyond the textual metaphors to intersect with social ritual, folklore, and the cult of the cross.  We will also see how unsettling forces of otherness lay embedded within such arboreal iconography, particularly apparent in the figure of the Green Man.  This paper maps key ideas surrounding the tree of life and its arboreal aesthetics in Renaissance culture, highlighting recurring motifs and ideas, and demonstrating its double nature whereby orthodoxy was shadowed by the Other.

Armelle Sabatier (Université Paris Panthéon Assas), “Stones, Trees and Wood – Envisioning Garden Statuary in Shakespeare”

This paper aims at studying some of the uses of trees in early modern garden statuary. In addition to the well-known art of Tudor topiary, trees could then function as ornaments for statues made of stone or could also be integrated into the highly sophisticated display of animated statues in Jacobean gardens. By focusing on two plays by Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing and The Winter’s Tale, this presentation will tackle the main aesthetics issues of the role of trees in gardens as staged by Shakespeare. Starting with the question of trees as theatrical properties, this study will explore the cultural but also philosophical evolution of the representations of trees and wood in Shakespeare’s later plays, more precisely when these elements are integrated in garden statuary.

Chantal Schütz (École Polytechnique, Paris), “Of trees and lutes: yew, ebony, spruce and rosewood in resonance”

Almost all early modern musical instruments rely on wood, be they wind or string instruments, percussions or keyboards. Among them, the lute is remarkable since it combines several different essences to produce a rich and eloquent compound that some authors have even regarded as a mouthpiece for the trees from which they are issued, identifying a deep connection between the music produced by the instrument and the primal power of the natural element whose destruction was necessary to create the human artefact. The complexity of the instrument also exposes the economic circuits involved in obtaining the types of wood necessary for the instruments, and hence its composite identity: Italian, Bavarian and exotic woods, sometimes combined with ivory or other precious materials. Finally, the very shape of the instrument, particularly in later developments such as the theorbo, refers, like recorders and other elongated wind instruments, to the shape of the tree or branch that produced them, making it, in effect, a piece of speaking/singing wood. The lute thus constitutes a perfect example of hybridity in the artistic uses of wood and trees, put in the service of personal expression yet always recalling its connection to the natural world, emphasized in particular by the fact that the strings necessary to make the instrument resonate are manufactured from the guts of animals (mostly sheep). The apparently trivial nature of the materials used to create heavenly harmonies was not lost on authors who, like Shakespeare, noted and interrogated this incongruity, seeing in it a relevant epitome of human contradictions.

Nicolas Thibault (Sorbonne Université), “The tree that hides the man: manipulating and reassigning royal symbols in Thomas of Woodstock

“The huge greate Oke was once a plant.” This observation, found in Timothy Kendall’s anthology Flower of epigrammes (1577), seems to state the obvious: trees do grow out of smaller (and frailer) plants and are subject to time. Yet this image is far from the emblematic representation of the oak, inherited from the Bible, which was often used in early modern poetry or political theory. Traditionally, the oak was the tree of Jupiter and connoted strength, immutability, and majesty, thus making it an ideal royal symbol (with the cedar). However, as Andrew McRae notes, “the politics of the oak—and of trees more generally—were [then] by no means as settled as it would become in a later period.” (2012) This then allowed for all sorts of rhetorical and semantic play, in particular in late Elizabethan history plays which depict the troubled reigns of contested kings. With a focus on the anonymous play Thomas of Woodstock (c. 1591-1595), I would like to explore how royal symbols such as the oak (and the cedar) are manipulated and subverted on stage. Like Kendall’s epigram, the play insists on the precarious nature of trees, both real and symbolic, showing how inadequate and artificial rhetorical tropes can be. Deprived of its emblematic and specific quality, the actual tree reappears behind the symbol. That symbol can then be reassigned to other potential candidates, which allows the play to challenge essential tenets of royal orthodoxy such as the king’s uniqueness.

Sophie Lemercier-Goddard (ENS LSH, Lyon): ““The Ecco of the woods”: Woodlands as the theatre of the colonial enterprise in Virginia and New England”

Trees occupy a central space in early modern travel, exploration and trade. A good indicator of a country’s riches and economic potential, the thick woodlands of America were also a highly disputed ground in Indian and English face-offs and an obstacle to observation and exploitation. The desire to cleanse away the woods – to convert them into fruitful meadows while securing their coveted primary resource – did not however erase their poetic and metaphorical dimension : in John Smith’s Generall Historie of Virginia (1624) and A Description of New England (1616), the woods become a space of performance. More than a simple background or a pastoral setting, they set the stage of the colonial enterprise : they were a site of reinvention on an individual and a collective level and a few wooden objects created a dramaturgy of power which pitted two different ecosystems against each other.  

Justin Begley (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich), “Animalis Arbores: The Case of Nehemiah Grew’s Trees”

At first glance, animals and trees have little in common. Animals are mobile creatures that eat, breathe, and mate, while trees are immobile and do not visibly engage in any of these behaviours. In seventeenth-century England, however, naturalists began to recognise that animals and trees are not so different after all. With a focus on the botanist and Secretary of the Royal Society, Nehemiah Grew (1641-1712), my paper will explore some of the ways in which trees were reimagined during the period in question. As I will seek to show, with his careful anatomical research and creative application of plant-animal analogies, Grew revealed that plants, much like animals, are living and active beings, which consume food, intake air, and engage in sexual intercourse. By making these largely invisible vegetative functions palpable, Grew, in turn, challenged long-held ideas about plant life and the scale of nature.

Laurent Folliot (Sorbonne Université), “Parasitical Beauty: The Materiality of Trees in Picturesque Discourse”

Theorists of picturesque beauty, such as William Gilpin in his Remarks on Forest Scenery (1791) and Uvedale Price in his Essay on the Picturesque (1794), tend to promote ways of looking at trees and woodland that are comparatively free from utilitarian or edifying considerations, tonal harmony and textural effects being the primary concern of painters and connoisseurs alike. However formalistic such an approach may appear, the picturesque emphasis on detail renews the perception of trees by stressing their materiality: they are worth looking at, not merely as parts of a whole (the forest landscape), but also because of their singularities, of their knots and knobs, their lividities and discolourations, even their excrescences and parasites. In other words, the late eighteenth-century imagination is fascinated with trees because they offer a tangible picture of organic life in its endurance and transience—warts and all.    

Nicolas Bourgès (Sorbonne Université), “Trees as vehicles for reflection about nature and time in the poetry of William Cowper (1731-1800)”

In his poems William Cowper alludes to different types of trees, the meaning of which can be interpreted in two ways. In The Task (1785), the longest poem he wrote, they are used as symbols enabling the poet to contrast natural beauty and harmony to urban development. He also invites the readers to question their relationship to the environment through observing and describing how animals use trees, their natural habitat. Another central aspect of his poetical works is the association between trees and time: The Poplar Field (1784) and Yardley Oak, an unfinished poem from 1791, both include a philosophical dimension that questions the link between persistence and change.  Cowper’s allusions to trees also reflect his interest in gardening – which he practiced while living at Olney (Buckinghamshire) – and refer to Weston Park, a nearby property which is now destroyed, and where the poet found inspiration. Analysing the role of trees in Cowper’s poems gives one the opportunity to draw parallels with visual arts, including echoes to the concept of the Picturesque. Thus he can be considered as a writer bridging the gap between Augustan and Romantic poetry.

 

REPORT du SEM 12.05: A.-M. Miller-Blaise, “Trees of Life and Trees of Knowledge”, 17 h 30, S. 001, Sorbonne


S
uite au report de la séance du 24 mars, nous avons le plaisir de vous inviter au prochain séminaire de l’Axe Modernités 16-18 sur la thématique “Usages de l’arbre à la première modernité” où nous entendrons Anne-Marie Miller-Blaise, (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle), pour une intervention intitulée:  

“Trees of Life and Trees of Knowledge: from Leaf to Page in Early Modern Protestant England”


Le séminaire aura lieu le jeudi 12 mai  à la Maison de la recherche de Sorbonne Université en salle S. 001, de 17 h 30 à 19 h 00 et par zoom (voir le lien ci-dessous).


A l’issue du séminaire, nous vous proposons, pour celles et ceux qui le peuvent, d’aller prendre un verre pour célébrer la fin du semestre.
Bien cordialement, 
Line Cottegnies (et pour Anne-Valérie Dulac et Alexis Tadié)

Participer à la réunion Zoomhttps://us02web.zoom.us/j/83241024850?pwd=dXBYSzJKT3FGVXBoRThtSVdCODdtZz09
ID de réunion : 832 4102 4850Code secret : 570159 

COLL. International: 8-9 avril 2022: “Le corps du monarque sur la scène européenne à la première modernité”

COLL: 8-9/04/22 “Le corps du monarque en scène : le théâtre de la monarchie dans l’Europe de la 1ère modernité”, SOrbonne Université

https://clios.hypotheses.org/765

Attention: Veuillez noter que 2 représentations de Richard II (en anglais) sont prévues dans le cadre de ce colloque, par la compagnie britannique Scena Mundi. Attention, pour des raisons indépendantes de notre volonté, les représentations ne peuvent plus avoir lieu au Réfectoire des Cordeliers et auront lieu au TOTEM, 11 place Nationale, 75013 Paris (Métro Nationale / Olympiades / Bibliothèque François Miterrand). Billetterie ci-dessous (nombre de places limité, réservation obligatoire, merci). 
8-9 avril 2022
Sorbonne Université (UR VALE et Projet ClioS : L’Histoire immédiate en scène)
Université de Rennes 2  (Cellam EA 3206)
Colloque soutenu par l’Initiative Théâtre
 
8 avril 2022, Amphi Bilsky-Pasquier, Site des Cordeliers
9 h 30 – 10 h 30, Conférence plénière: Gisèle VENET (Université Sorbonne nouvelle): « ‘Deform’d, unfinish’d, sent before my time’ – le corps de Richard dans Richard III, ou le déclin de la théorie des « deux corps du roi » (Présidence : Christine Sukic)
Pause
11h00-12h15 : Le corps royal et la raison d’état (Présidence : Tiphaine Karsenti)
Inès ZAHRA (Université Paris Nanterre), « La représentation d’Henri III dans la tragédie ligueuse à l’issue de la mise à mort des frères Guise. »
Christine SUKIC (Université Champagne Ardenne): « ‘Search, surgeon, and resolve me what thou seest’: Anatomy of Kingship in Christopher Marlowe’s The Massacre at Paris (1593) ».
Déjeuner
14h 00 – 15 h 15 : Dévoiler le corps du roi I (Présidence : Anne Teulade)
Louise FANG (Université Paris Nord) : « ’Body o’ me !’ : la visibilité du corps d’Henry VIII dans When You See Me You Know Me de Samuel Rowley (1604) »
Florence D’ARTOIS (Sorbonne Université) : « Le corps dansé du roi dans le théâtre du siècle d’or ».
Pause
15 h 45 – 17 h 00 : Dévoiler le corps du roi II (Présidence : Christophe Couderc)
Hector RUIZ SOTO (Sorbonne Université) : « L’apariencia théâtrale au miroir du dévoilement royal : politique(s) d’un effet scénique ».
Josefa TERRIBILINI (Université de Lausanne) : « Plusieurs corps pour un seul roi. Les gardes comme relais du pouvoir royal (Rotrou, Corneille) ».
17 h 00 – 18 h 00 : Conférence plénière : Karen BRITLAND (University of Wisconsin at Madison),: « ‘Such is the breath of kings’: Unkinging Richard in Richard II’ » (Présidence : Line Cottegnies

19 h 30 : Le TOTEM, 11 place Nationale : Représentation théâtrale : Richard II par la Compagnie Scena Mundi (Metteuse en scène : Celia Dorland). Gratuit pour les étudiants et les personnels de Sorbonne Université, sur inscription obligatoire:

Tickets : Richard II
Tickets : Richard II – Billetweb
www.billetweb.fr
 
Samedi 9 avril : Salle des Actes, Sorbonne
8 h 45 : Accueil café
9 h 30 – 10 h 45 :  La crise du droit divin (Présidence : Gisèle Venet)
Anne-Valérie DULAC (Sorbonne Université) : « L’étoffe d’un roi : De la pesanteur tragique des fourrures du Roi Lear de William Shakespeare ».
Gilles BERTHEAU (Université de Tours): « La Tragédie de Chabot de George Chapman ou la chute du roi thaumaturge ».
Pause
11 h 00 – 12 h 30 : Rencontre avec Cecilia Dorland (Metteuse en scène) et les comédiens de la troupe Scena Mundi, animée par John Delsinne, Béatrice Rouchon et Nicolas Thibault.
Déjeuner
13 h 45 – 15 h 00 : Le corps de la reine en question I (Présidence : Claire Gheeraert)
Yan BRAILOWSKY (Université Paris Nanterre) : « Les trois corps des reines dans le théâtre élisabéthain : matérialité, généalogie, représentation »
Marie-Thérèse MOUREY (Sorbonne Université) : « Le corps sacré de la Reine : ‘Catherine de Géorgie’ (1649), d’Andreas Gryphius (1616-1664) ».
Pause
15 h 15 – 16 h 30 : Le corps de la reine en question II (Présidence : Guillaume Navaud)
Aurélie GRIFFIN (Université Sorbonne nouvelle) : “La division du corps royal dans The Tragedy of Mariam d’Elizabeth Cary (1613)”.
Caroline LABRUNE (Université de Rouen) : « Le front de la reine. La majesté tourmentée dans le théâtre tragique de l’époque moderne ».
16 h 30 : Cocktail de clôture.
Colloque organisé par Line Cottegnies (Sorbonne Université) et Anne Teulade (Université de Rennes 2)
 
19 h 30 : TOTEM, 11 place Nationale : Représentation théâtrale : Richard II par la Compagnie Scena Mundi (Metteuse en scène : Celia Dorland). Gratuit pour les étudiants et les personnels de Sorbonne Université, sur inscription obligatoire:

Tickets : Richard II
Tickets : Richard II – Billetweb
www.billetweb.fr
 
Colloque organisé avec le soutien financier de :
Sorbonne Université : ED IV, FIR, Initiative Théâtre, PRITEPS, Projet Emergence ClioS, Unité de Recherche VALE (Sorbonne Université), Direction des Affaires culturelles.
l’Université Rennes 2 : Unité de recherche CELLAM (EA 3206)
l’Université Sorbonne nouvelle : Unité de recherche PRISMES
la Société Française Shakespeare.
 
Colloque et représentations théâtrales organisés avec le soutien financier de :
Sorbonne Université : ED IV, FIR, Initiative Théâtre, PRITEPS, Projet Emergence ClioS, Unité de Recherche VALE (Sorbonne Université), Direction des Affaires culturelles.
l’Université Rennes 2 : Unité de recherche CELLAM (EA 3206)
l’Université Sorbonne nouvelle : Unité de recherche PRISME
la Société Française Shakespeare.

SEM hors thème, 22/03/2022, L. Carvello, “Declamation in ‘Julius Caesar'” and R. Stearn, “Early Modern Servants and the Production of Atmosphere”, MR, Sorbonne, S.002 et Zoom..

Chères et chers Collègues, Chères doctorantes, chers Doctorants,

Nous avons le plaisir de vous inviter à un séminaire hors thème de Modernités 16-18  le MARDI 22 mars, de 17 h 30  à 19 h 30, où nous entendrons les deux interventions suivantes. Le séminaire se déroulera à la maison de la recherche, en salle S. 002, ainsi que par zoom : 


Participer à la réunion Zoomhttps://us02web.zoom.us/j/83241024850?pwd=dXBYSzJKT3FGVXBoRThtSVdCODdtZz09
ID de réunion : 832 4102 4850Code secret : 570159
22/03/2022, S. 002, 17 h 30: 


Lesley Carvello (University of Sussex), « Multiple Perspectives: Declamation in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. » 

Examining the employment of classical rhetoric in early modern drama, this exploration of Shakespeare’s use of rhetorical techniques to develop, maintain and question multiple perspectives in Julius Caesar considers Elizabethan understanding of declamation. 


Et 
Robert Stearn (Birkbeck College), “Pricking and Droning: Early Modern Servants and the Production of Atmosphere”

This paper begins by investigating sixteenth- and seventeenth-century handbooks for servants and employers, in order to explore how emotions were understood as objects of skill in non-elite contexts. It traces a trajectory in the rhetoric of servant handbooks, c. 1550–1700: while repeating the same set of scripturally derived servant virtues, these texts increasingly emphasised the tactical aspects of servants’ work and localised the evaluation and motivation of that work in employers’ socially validated expectations. Rather than understanding servant fidelity as mere performance, however, late seventeenth-century handbooks turned the dispositions and emotions of servants into objects of skill. These prescriptive works thus attest to a twofold vernacular account of servant skill, encompassing both servants’ practical household competencies and also a prior skill which included elements of what might now be called emotional labour. The paper then uses this body of prescriptive literature to interpret seventeenth-century uses of the word ‘drone’. A derogatory term of social description, ‘drone’ had three meanings in the seventeenth century: a monotonous noise or indistinct, irrational speech; a stingless bee superfluous to the hive’s division of labour; an idle person who contributed nothing to the community but lived off others’ work. Using the twofold account of skill outlined in part one to focus on the psychological dimension that the term ‘drone’ developed over the seventeenth century, the paper suggests that the insult picked out those who failed to develop an aptitude for skilled self-government. Finally, combining this investigation of the sonic, social, and entomological meanings of ‘drone’ with evidence drawn from autobiographical writing, the paper argues that, for some employers, what seventeenth-century domestic servants produced was an atmosphere.

Short biographies

Lesley Carvello: Having previously studied at Bristol University, RADA, Cambridge University and King’s College London, Lesley Carvello is currently a doctoral researcher at Sussex University working on a PhD in Rhetoric and Shakespeare under the supervision of Professor Andrew Hadfield. 

Robert Stearn recently completed his PhD in English at Birkbeck, University of London. His thesis, ‘Managing Skill, 1680–1730: Domestic Service and the Forms of Practical Knowledge’, argued that the institution of domestic service offered diversely situated writers ways to think about skill as a component of antagonistic everyday social relations. He is currently revising his thesis for publication and writing an article about the diaries of Sarah Cowper (1644–1720), which explores metaphors of abrasion as a way of describing what it was that early modern servants produced. 

SEM 18/02, A.-V. Dulac, “England’s ‘Ragged Regiment’: Memorial Figures in Wood for Kings and Queens”, par Zoom

La prochaine séance du séminaire Modernités 16-18 portera sur la thématique “Usages de l’arbre à la première modernité”. Attention, date exceptionnelle: le séminaire aura lieu le VENDREDI 18 février, de 14 h à 15 h 30.

Nous aurons le plaisir d’entendre:

Anne-Valérie Dulac (MCF Sorbonne Université, en délégation CNRS auprès du LARCA et de la Maison Française d’Oxford),

pour une intervention sur:

“England’s ‘Ragged Regiment’: Memorial Figures in Wood for Kings and Queens”

Attention! Exceptionnellement, et en raison de la situation sanitaire, cette séance se tiendra en ligne uniquement: lien zoom ci-dessous.

Heure : 18 févr. 2022 02:00 PM Paris

Participer à la réunion Zoom
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87649858967?pwd=dTlGQW1VdGtwSStRczdaNk1Tb0thUT09

ID de réunion : 876 4985 8967
Code secret : 850292

SUITE DU PROGRAMME

11 mars, 9 h -17h 00: Journée d’étude hors thème, “Genre Trouble in Early Modern England”, avec Queen Mary University, EN LIGNE (organisation : Emma Bartel). Programme ici.

22 mars, 17 h 30-19 h 30: Séminaire hors thème: Lesley Carvello, « Multiple Perspectives: Declamation in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. » et Robert Stearn (Birkbeck College), tba.

24 mars: Anne-Marie Miller-Blaise, Sorbonne Nouvelle, “The cross taught all wood to resound his name”: The Tree of Life, Trees, and Life in the Early Modern Christian Imagination.

12 mai Alexis Tadié, Sorbonne Université, “Autour de John Evelyn’s Sylva, or a Discourse of Forest-Trees and the Propogation of Timber in His Majesty’s Dominions (1662)”.

23 juin: journée d’étude

Hors Thème: JE “Genre Trouble”, 11/03/22, par zoom

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Genre Trouble in Early Modern England (1500–1800) 

Queen Mary University of London and Sorbonne Université 

Friday 11th March 2022, 9:00-17:00 GMT – Online 

Keynote: Kathryn Murphy (University of Oxford)

We are pleased to announce that our online conference “Genre Trouble in Early Modern England (1500-1800)”, co-hosted by Queen Mary University of London and Sorbonne Université (VALE), will take place on Friday 11th March, 9:00-17:00 (GMT). If you would like to attend, please register here: https://tinyurl.com/genre-trouble.

Please find attached the poster and the programme below. 

If you have any questions, please email us at genre.emp.conference@gmail.com

Best wishes,

Emma Bartel and Katie Ebner-Landy

__________________

Programme

9:00-9:10: Introduction

Life-writing

9:10-10:00: Martin Thompson (University of Manchester) ‘Un-editing’ the Autobiographical Fragments of Mary Ward (1585-1645): taking the texts on their own terms Continuer la lecture de « Hors Thème: JE “Genre Trouble”, 11/03/22, par zoom »

Texte de Cadrage

Alexander Cozens, The shape, skeleton and foliage of 32 species of Trees, &c, 1786, p. 11 (https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.101521)

 

Dans une récente monographie consacrée à l’arbre de vie et à l’esthétique sylvestre dans la littérature anglaise de la première modernité, Victoria Bladen souligne l’hybridité essentielle des usages littéraires et symboliques de l’arbre : “[Early modern] writers drew on the motif and its rich language of trees to articulate spiritual and political states and to create hybrid terrains in their work that intersected material spaces with landscapes of the mind.”[1]

C’est à cette intersection que nous proposons de réfléchir dans le cadre du séminaire Modernités 16-18 (https://earlymodern.hypotheses.org/) et des événements associés. L’arbre, tout autant que la matière qu’il produit, le bois, sont toujours déjà investis d’un substrat symbolique dont les ramifications et les racines sont nombreuses. À cet égard, l’opposition entre l’arbre et le bois est loin de se réduire à une opposition entre animé et inanimé : en effet, ne parle-t-on pas de bois mort ou vivant ? Si l’arbre puise encore très largement à un arrière-plan et un héritage biblique et théologique, mythologique et folklorique, philosophique et littéraire multiséculaire, la période voit toutefois de profonds changements s’opérer dans la perception, la compréhension, l’utilisation symbolique et matérielle et, au final, l’exploitation des arbres. Outre les mutations socio-culturelles et économiques qui caractérisent la période (transformation des paysages, enclosures, réquisitions, destructions des parcs aristocratiques et des réserves de chasse, rationalisation dans l’exploitation des forêts), les XVIe, XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles correspondent également à un changement plus vaste des sensibilités vis-à-vis de la nature et du végétal. Ces glissements s’expriment dans le renouveau du questionnement autour de la place de l’homme dans la nature et dans la Création – on songe ici par exemple au tournant cartésien et ses échos outre-Manche –, en même temps que dans le développement de l’expérimentalisme et l’observation scientifique. La période voit ainsi l’essor de de la science botanique et les progrès de la classification des arbres, avec tous les bouleversements induits par l’entreprise coloniale (découverte, exploitation et importation d’espèces).

L’arbre demeure également une métaphore et un outil épistémologiques, tout en acquérant des usages et sens nouveaux : on songe ici par exemple au ramisme, aux arborescences qui précèdent de nombreux traités, aux évolutions de la généalogie, aux évolutions du modèle de l’arbre dans la pensée politique ou bien encore à la « sylva » comme genre discursif.

La journée d’étude du 23 juin 2022 tentera de cerner sur ce que l’on peut identifier comme une révolution du regard sur l’arbre et le bois à la première modernité (XVIe-XVIIIe siècles), pour mettre en évidence la manière dont, à partir d’apparents invariants dans les héritages symboliques, l’arbre se transforme dans les productions culturelles, pour se voir progressivement approprié dans sa singularité – l’arbre et non plus la forêt – et investi de nouveaux sens, plus polysémiques et ouverts sur les problématiques de la modernité. À partir des questions de l’arbre, on se propose de penser en particulier les mutations épistémologiques et esthétiques qui engagent les rapports de l’humain et de la nature (avec l’émergence d’une conscience pré-écologique, mais aussi pré-romantique) et ceux de l’humain et de la matière, à travers les productions artistiques et artisanales.

Les contributions à la journée pourront aborder les thèmes suivants.

  • L’arbre et l’imagination : l’évolution des représentations, du symbolisme et des fonctions de l’arbre et des arbres dans la littérature (théâtre, pastorale, littérature gothique ou romantique…) ; les transformations des héritages religieux, folkloriques, mythologiques, symboliques ; l’arbre comme objet esthétique ;
  • Les représentations graphiques et picturales de l’arbre et leurs évolutions (tableaux, traités, illustrations, peinture, iconographie en général) ;
  • Les questions sociales, économiques et culturelles concernant la transformation du rapport à l’arbre dans la société (transformation des paysages, de l’environnement, l’exploitation forestière, la législation forestière, les traités sylvicoles, la question des chasses, les parcs, commons, espaces publics et privés…) ;
  • L’arbre et la politique : les enjeux de l’appropriation et de la possession de l’arbre (en période révolutionnaire notamment) ; l’arbre dans les modèles politiques… l’arbre et la définition de l’identité nationale, sociale, individuelle, genrée…
  • L’arbre et le voyage, les voyages de l’arbre : l’arbre et l’entreprise coloniale, arbres dans les récits de voyage, arbres nouveaux et développement d’une pensée de « l’exotisme » ; arbres fantastiques et imaginaires ;
  • L’arbre et les sciences modernes : l’évolution des classifications, le développement de la science botanique ; l’arbre et l’expérimentalisme ;
  • L’arbre et / dans la philosophie :  l’arbre dans l’herméneutique (table des matières à arborescence, l’arbre comme modèle de développement épistémologique, arbre de la philosophie, arbre de la connaissance, arbre encyclopédique, arbre généalogique, arbor juridictionis ) ; les anthologies de Sylva…
  • L’arbre et la matière : rapport du bois à l’arbre et spécificités des espèces, métiers du travail du bois, évolution du travail du bois, concurrence de nouveaux matériaux
  • L’arbre dans les arts (objets d’arts, sculpture sur bois, art topiaire…) ; l’arbre et le jardin…

Les propositions de 150 mots sont à envoyer avant le 1er mars 2022 à line.cottegnies@sorbonne-universite.fr, anne-valerie.dulac@sorbonne-universite.fr et alexis.tadie@sorbonne-universite.fr.

[1] Victoria Bladen, The Tree of Life and Arboreal Aesthetics in Early Modern Literature, New York and Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2022.  

PAR: Sillages Critiques 31, 2021, « Le spectacle de l’histoire récente et immédiate sur la scène britannique de l’époque moderne et contemporaine »

31 | 2021

Representing Recent and Immediate History on the Early Modern and Contemporary British StagesSous la direction de  Elisabeth Angel-Perez, Line Cottegnies et Virginie YvernaultHenry VI, Mise en sc. Thomas Jolly
Informations sur cette image
Crédits : Nicolas Joubard.FrançaisEnglish

Ce numéro thématique de la revue Sillages critiques réunit une sélection de textes issus des travaux du projet Émergence ClioS (de Sorbonne Université), co-piloté par Line Cottegnies et Elisabeth Angel-Perez, et qui a porté, entre 2019 et 2021, sur le théâtre d’histoire immédiate sur la scène britannique de la première modernité et de la période contemporaine. Il s’agissait de réfléchir à la nature spécifique de ce théâtre de temps de crise qui s’approprie l’histoire « contemporaine », qu’elle soit récente ou immédiate, en faisant appel à des spécialistes de théâtre des deux périodes considérées.

Continuer la lecture de « PAR: Sillages Critiques 31, 2021, « Le spectacle de l’histoire récente et immédiate sur la scène britannique de l’époque moderne et contemporaine » »

Nouveau Thème, Sem Modernités 16-18: “Usages de l’arbre à la première modernité” (“Uses of the tree in the early modern period) (2022-23)

Alexander Cozens, The shape, skeleton and foliage of 32 species of Trees, &c, 1786, p. 11 (https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.101521)
Le thème retenu pour le séminaire commun “Modernités 16-18” à compter de septembre 2021 est “Usages de l’arbre dans l’Angleterre de la première modernité”. Le programme des séances du séminaire et des événements scientifiques associés sera prochainement communiqué sur notre site. ———- Texte de cadrage et appel à communications pour la journée d’étude du 23 juin 2022:

Thème : Usages de l’arbre à la première modernité (Early-modern uses and appropriations of the tree), 2022-2023

Dans une récente monographie consacrée à l’arbre de vie et à l’esthétique sylvestre dans la littérature anglaise de la première modernité, Victoria Bladen souligne l’hybridité essentielle des usages littéraires et symboliques de l’arbre : “[Early modern] writers drew on the motif and its rich language of trees to articulate spiritual and political states and to create hybrid terrains in their work that intersected material spaces with landscapes of the mind.”[1] C’est à cette intersection que nous proposons de réfléchir dans le cadre du séminaire Modernités 16-18 (https://earlymodern.hypotheses.org/) et des événements associés. L’arbre, tout autant que la matière qu’il produit, le bois, sont toujours déjà investis d’un substrat symbolique dont les ramifications et les racines sont nombreuses. À cet égard, l’opposition entre l’arbre et le bois est loin de se réduire à une opposition entre animé et inanimé : en effet, ne parle-t-on pas de bois mort ou vivant ? Si l’arbre puise encore très largement à un arrière-plan et un héritage biblique et théologique, mythologique et folklorique, philosophique et littéraire multiséculaire, la période voit toutefois de profonds changements s’opérer dans la perception, la compréhension, l’utilisation symbolique et matérielle et, au final, l’exploitation des arbres. Outre les mutations socio-culturelles et économiques qui caractérisent la période (transformation des paysages, enclosures, réquisitions, destructions des parcs aristocratiques et des réserves de chasse, rationalisation dans l’exploitation des forêts), les XVIe, XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles correspondent également à un changement plus vaste des sensibilités vis-à-vis de la nature et du végétal. Ces glissements s’expriment dans le renouveau du questionnement autour de la place de l’homme dans la nature et dans la Création – on songe ici par exemple au tournant cartésien et ses échos outre-Manche –, en même temps que dans le développement de l’expérimentalisme et l’observation scientifique. La période voit ainsi l’essor de de la science botanique et les progrès de la classification des arbres, avec tous les bouleversements induits par l’entreprise coloniale (découverte, exploitation et importation d’espèces). L’arbre demeure également une métaphore et un outil épistémologiques, tout en acquérant des usages et sens nouveaux : on songe ici par exemple au ramisme, aux arborescences qui précèdent de nombreux traités, aux évolutions de la généalogie, aux évolutions du modèle de l’arbre dans la pensée politique ou bien encore à la « sylva » comme genre discursif. La journée d’étude du 23 juin 2022 tentera plus spécifiquement de cerner sur ce que l’on peut identifier comme une révolution du regard sur l’arbre et le bois à la première modernité (XVIe-XVIIIe siècles), pour mettre en évidence la manière dont, à partir d’apparents invariants dans les héritages symboliques, l’arbre se transforme dans les productions culturelles, pour se voir progressivement approprié dans sa singularité – l’arbre et non plus la forêt – et investi de nouveaux sens, plus polysémiques et ouverts sur les problématiques de la modernité. À partir des questions de l’arbre, on se propose de penser en particulier les mutations épistémologiques et esthétiques qui engagent les rapports de l’humain et de la nature (avec l’émergence d’une conscience pré-écologique, mais aussi pré-romantique) et ceux de l’humain et de la matière, à travers les productions artistiques et artisanales.
[1] Victoria Bladen, The Tree of Life and Arboreal Aesthetics in Early Modern Literature, New York and Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2022.

COLL: 18-19 nov. 2021: “Les Règles du jeu à la période moderne / The Rules of the Game in the Early Modern Period”, Sorbonne Université

“Les Règles du jeu à la période moderne / The Rules of the Game in the Early Modern Period”

19 novembre 2021 : Institut d’Etudes Avancées, 17 quai d’Anjou, 75004.

18 novembre 2021 : Maison de la recherche, Sorbonne Université, 28 rue Serpente, 75006.

Programme scientifique

Jeudi 18 novembre 2021

9h00 : Accueil des participants

9h15 : Conférence plénière

Elisabeth Belmas (Université Paris 13) : “Réflexions sur l’histoire des jeux à l’époque moderne”

10h20 : Atelier I : Les règles de l’art

10h20 :

Abigail Shinn (Goldmiths, Royaume-Uni) : “Spenser’s games”

Jeanne Mathieu (Toulouse II Jean Jaurès) : “La dispute religieuse au théâtre : Du jeu de rôle au jeu drôle dans The Conflict of Conscience de Nathaniel Woodes et A Game at Chess de Thomas Middleton”

11h30 : pause café

11h50 : Caroline Baird (Independent Scholar) : “Stakes and Hazards: The dangers of the Rules of the Game in The Wise Woman of Hogsdon and A Woman Killed with Kindness

Karin Kukkonen (University of Oslo) : “Rule-Based Creativity in Salon Games, Poetics and the Novel”

13h00 : déjeuner

14h00 : Atelier II : Du bon usage des règles
14h00 : Emmanuel Buron (Sorbonne Nouvelle) : « Jouer son personnage » : Jeu théâtral et identité sociale en France au XVIe siècle.

Bénédicte Louvat (Sorbonne Université) : “Des règles pour jouer dans le théâtre français du XVIIe siècle”

15h10 : pause café

15h30 : Guillaume Winter (Université d’Artois) : “‘Men are born to be dice-players’ : sociologie du jeu de dés à l’époque élisabéthaine”

Emma Bartel (Sorbonne Université) et Louise Fang (Sorbonne Paris Nord) : “Playing or Praying by the Book: Unruly Rules of Devotion in Mary Evelyn’s Manuscripts (1665-1685)”

Vendredi 19 novembre

9h15 : Conférence plénière

Richard Scholar (Université de Durham, Royaume-Uni): “Caprice between Rules and Diversions”

10h20 : Atelier III : Déjouer les règles

10h20 : Pascale Drouet (Université de Poitiers) : “Les ‘règles’ du jeu d’Autolycus :  kairós, mètis et mimicry dans The Winter’s Tale

Judith le Blanc (Centre de musique baroque de Versailles/Université de Rouen) : “Jouer à déjouer les règles : les jeux forains ou l’invention ludique”

11h30: pause café

11h50 : Gemma Tidman (Oxford University, Royaume-Uni) : “Cache-cache: ce que laissent entendre les règles de quelques jeux de l’oie du 18e siècle”

Valérie Capdeville (Université Sorbonne Paris Nord) : “The Betting Book in Eighteenth-Century Britain: Defining or Defying the Rules of Sociability”

13h00 : Déjeuner

14h00 : Atelier IV : S’affranchir des règles

14h : Emma Griffin (University of East Anglia, Royaume-Uni) : “The Place of Violence and Sport in the Long Eighteenth Century, 1700-1850”

Sylvie Kleiman-Lafon (Université Paris 8) : “Tricher au jeu”

15h10 : Pause café

15h30 :

Pierre Labrune (Sorbonne Université) : “A Royal Set-To: boxe, jargon et politique sous la Régence”

Daniel O’Quinn (Université de Guelph, Canada) : “Eighteenth-Century Sport and the Question of Precarious Affiliation”

16h40 : fin des travaux et conclusions.

SEM 14/06/21: Pierre Lurbe, “‘The game of human life’: jeu(x) et enjeu(x) chez Adam Ferguson”, 14h, Zoom

La prochaine séance du séminaire Modernités 16-18 de l’équipe VALE aura lieu à distance le lundi 14 juin à 14h, avec:

Pierre Lurbe (Sorbonne Université): “‘The game of human life’: jeu(x) et enjeu(x) chez Adam Ferguson” (séminaire par zoom)

Au plaisir de vous y retrouver, 
Bien cordialement, 
Alexis Tadié et Line Cottegnies

Heure : 14 juin 2021 02:00 PM Paris

Participer à la réunion Zoom

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83063404987?pwd=VkVMS3JhNjVaZDZ0dmVsUmNtY3padz09

ID de réunion : 830 6340 4987

Code secret : 152478

CFP: Colloque, 8-9/04/2022: “Le corps du roi en scène : le théâtre de la monarchie dans l’Europe de la 1ère modernité”, Sorbonne Univ. / Rennes 2

Sorbonne Université (UR VALE et Projet ClioS : L’Histoire immédiate en scène) et Université de Rennes 2  (Cellam EA 3206)

Colloque à Sorbonne Université, Maison de la Recherche, 5 rue Serpente, 75006 Paris 

Evénement soutenu par le PRITEPS et par l’Initiative Théâtre

 8-9 avril 2022

Aux XVIe et XVIIe siècles, de nombreuses pièces de théâtre qui mettent en scène l’histoire moderne s’attachent à la représentation des monarques. Que ces derniers apparaissent en majesté ou en situation de crise – qu’ils soient confrontés à la guerre, une transition dynastique et même au régicide – leur mise en scène engage des questions de valeur et de représentation. 

Nous proposons d’interroger les modalités de mise en scène du monarque et du régime monarchique en focalisant l’étude sur le corps du roi et ses attributs. Les diverses modalités de ses représentations, sa visibilité ou son invisibilité, sa représentation incarnée et contingente ou transcendante et sacralisante, les relais qu’il peut trouver dans des objets ou accessoires fonctionnant comme des ancrages matériels voire des emblèmes, sont autant d’entrées possibles pour cette enquête. 

À travers cette analyse des corps royaux, nous souhaiterions que soient envisagées les manières dont le théâtre se saisit des conceptions contemporaines de la monarchie et notamment de la sacralité postulée par les doctrines théologico-politiques qui se cristallisent, ainsi que l’a montré Ernst Kantorowicz (The King’s Two Bodies,1957), dans la double nature du corps royal. Les œuvres tendent-elles à illustrer la sacralité du corps royal, et dans ce cas selon quelles modalités ? Révèlent-elles à l’inverse des tensions autour de cette conception, en montrent-elles même la désagrégation ? Comment la représentation scénique incarnée traduit-elle ces valeurs engagées par le corps royal ? Comment se donnent à voir la transcendance, son absence ou sa déliquescence ?

Continuer la lecture de « CFP: Colloque, 8-9/04/2022: “Le corps du roi en scène : le théâtre de la monarchie dans l’Europe de la 1ère modernité”, Sorbonne Univ. / Rennes 2 »
Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search